15,334

Medical Calls

3,354

Fires

752

Public Assists

161

Responders

Members of Fort Worth, TX Local 440 are helping teachers learn life-saving first aid skills to help students and faculty who sustain a traumatic injury ... See MoreSee Less

#IAFF100years
As we celebrate our centennial, we’re IAFF member to make an investment to support the IAFF Foundation by donating $100 for our 100 years.

The need to help our brothers and sisters is ongoing. We rely on donations to support our Foundation's work.

Go to my.iaff.org/give100 to donate.

When you donate $100, we'll send you an exclusive 100th anniversary lapel pin.

The Foundation's core mission is to help our members and their families in their times of need. In just the last year, we assisted tens of thousands of members through incredibly challenging times, including back-to-back hurricanes, active shooter mass casualty events and incredible wildfires.

Watch this video to learn more about these efforts. youtu.be/ud6b5TRwsF4
... See MoreSee Less

#IAFF100years 
As we celebrate our centennial, we’re IAFF member to make an investment to support the IAFF Foundation by donating $100 for our 100 years.

The need to help our brothers and sisters is ongoing. We rely on donations to support our Foundations work. 

Go to https://my.iaff.org/give100 to donate.

When you donate $100, well send you an exclusive 100th anniversary lapel pin.

The Foundations core mission is to help our members and their families in their times of need. In just the last year, we assisted tens of thousands of members through incredibly challenging times, including back-to-back hurricanes, active shooter mass casualty events and incredible wildfires. 

Watch this video to learn more about these efforts. https://youtu.be/ud6b5TRwsF4

OVER ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SERVICE

In Tampa, as with other major American cities, the evolution from all volunteer to career fire companies occurred due to the arrival of steam technology. Tampa’s first organized volunteer fire department was founded in1884. Seven “bucket brigades” were organized to serve the city. On May 10, 1895, the city council passed ordinance #307 authorizing Tampa’s first professional, paid fire department. A. J. Harris was named chief to preside over 22 fire fighters in five stations at an annual budget of $18,000. The paid firefighters worked in the stations for ten to twelve days at a time. Most of the firefighters lived near their duty stations and were permitted to go home for meals, provided they could return within one hour. Their salary was equivalent to that of police patrol officers, about $600 a year. From May 10, 1895, forward the fire department began to evolve. First the “bucket brigades” were slowly replaced by hand operated pumpers pulled to the scene by the firefighters. Fire hydrants and steam engines were introduced to do the work of pumping water to firefighter’s hoses. With the introduction of steam engines came the requirement of horses to pull the extremely heavy apparatus. As the “horseless carriage” gained popularity, gasoline powered engines became accepted and Tampa’s fire department followed national trends and replaced the steam engine with state of the art 700 GPM LaFrance pumpers. On July 27,1914, horses were no longer used to pull apparatus for the department. The horses that remained were sold at auction.  read more

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We Do More Than Save Lives!

  Tampa Fire Fighters would like to thank everyone who has supported our donation drives throughout the years. With the generosity of our friends, we have been able to provide the community throughout the Tampa Bay area with programs designed to educate the public about the many aspects of fire prevention and safety. Through our non-profit (501c3) charity, Tampa Fire Fighters continue to support local area programs and services which have included but are not limited to the following: